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Welcome to our Club!

We meet Fridays at 7:00 AM
Newcastle Place
12600 N. Port Washington Road
Mequon, WI  53092
United States
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Editors note: This is the first in a three part series on the structure of Rotary.

Rotary is made up of three parts:

  1. Rotary Clubs - Rotary clubs unite dedicated people to exchange ideas, build relationships, and take action.
  2. Rotary International - Rotary International supports Rotary clubs worldwide by coordinating global programs and initiatives.
  3. The Rotary Foundation - The Rotary Foundation helps fund our humanitarian activities, from local service projects to global initiatives.

Together, we work to make lasting change in our communities and around the world.

Rotary Clubs

The heart of Rotary is our members, dedicated people who share a passion for community service and friendship.

Rotary members share ideas, make plans, hear from the community, and catch up with friends during club programs that fuel the impact we make.

After voters approved a $39.9 million referendum in April, the Grafton School District took its first step in renovation and expansion projects at Grafton High School, Kennedy and Woodview elementary schools by breaking ground in a Sept. 12 ceremony near the school district's offices.

“The district is very excited to see these projects get underway,” said Grafton Schools Superintendent Jeff Nelson in a district news release. “Through the entire planning and design process, we were focused on developing building solutions that would meet our students’ academic needs and ensure their continued safety, while also being fiscally responsible to the district’s taxpayers. I believe we’ve accomplished these goals.” 

The ceremony included a number of students representing each of its schools, from the elementary level to high school. Grafton High School senior Ian Bould spoke at the ceremony on behalf of the district's students.

"It was great to involve students because that's really what this whole process is for," Nelson said.

The groundbreaking is the culmination of a process that the district began with Hoffman Planning, Design & Construction in 2014. Hoffman will oversee the projects' construction.

“These projects address important needs at the three schools,” said Hoffman President Sam Statz. “In addition to enhancement of each school to accommodate more students and provide upgraded technology and athletic spaces, improvements in safety, security, and accessibility will also take place.” 

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Some moments from the Adult Spelling Bee held last week at Rotary Park, Mequon. Thanks to all participants for a very successful fundraiser. (Photos by Bob Blazich)

Chiara (pictured 6th from left) just came back from a wonderful weekend in Green Lake at the Rotary orientation. She met many other Rotary exchange students through this experience.

She is looking forward to meeting everyone this Friday morning at our Rotary meeting!

Jennifer Sutherland

Just because nobody complains doesn’t mean all parachutes are perfect. - Benny Hill

By Frank Bures from The Rotarian Magazine

Imagine, if you will, the worst meeting of your life: The clock moves more slowly than the laws of physics should allow. Garbled strands of jargon fall from the mouths of those around you. Whatever vague goals had been uttered before the meeting are forgotten, left far behind, like roadkill on a long ride to nowhere.

That trapped feeling is probably as old as the first tribal gathering. And judging by some books for sale today ("Meetings Suck," "Death by Meeting"), not much has changed in the intervening millennia.

Meetings may be one of the most maligned and dreaded of humanity’s rituals, but they are not going away. Nor should they: Every week, some 1.2 million Rotarians meet around the world in an effort to make it a little better. Every year, meetings, conferences, and conventions across the United States inject around $280 billion into the economy. And every day, millions of people meet at their workplace to try to move their company toward some goal.

Meet Norrie Daroga and his assistant Natasha of idavatars in Mequon.

Norrie was the high bidder for the Dessert of the Month at last years LobsterFest. Here he's holding the Schacht family favorite Pistachio Torte made by Cindy Schacht.

Be sure to attend this year's LobsterFest on September 30 and be the high bidder for this and many other items. Visit www.mylobsterfest.org for more information.

The Rotary Foundation and clubs along the Gulf Coast of Texas and Louisiana, USA, are collecting emergency relief funds to help flood victims of Hurricane Harvey, which slammed into southeast Texas over the weekend.

Severe rainfall has caused historic flooding along the Texas coast, including in Houston, the fourth largest city by population in the United States. Deluged towns in the region are in desperate need of aid as thousands of residents were forced to flee their homes. About 6.8 million people have been affected by the hurricane, which made landfall on 25 August.

With an estimated damage of $190 billion, Hurricane Harvey could be the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history.

“The power of Rotary is in the foundation's ability to pull help from around the world while local clubs provide immediate relief in their own communities,” says Don Mebus of the Rotary Club of Arlington, Texas.

Thanks to former MT member Jerry Gold, who transferred to Milwaukee North Shore RC, we have a great opportunity to do our first tree planting project. Mequon Nature Preserve is providing 200 trees for their restoration work and all they need are some people of action to plant them on Monday 16 October. We’ll be teaming with Milwaukee North Shore and possibly another Rotary Club, but volunteers can also be friends and family of members too.

Jerry has coordinated two work shifts 9am-12pm and 1:00pm-4:pm. The 200 hundred trees will mostly be 5 gallon buckets. But there is mulching and other things people can do to participate. Mequon Nature Preserve will supply the equipment needed.

Planning ahead for next year if we want to blow away our tree planting goal, we can also participate in planting 3,000 tree saplings. They do this around Earth day for their earth day initiative. Now that would really be an opportunity to show Rotary “making a difference”.

Thanks, Brian
D6270 Tree Planting Coordinator

The American Cancer Society Road to Recovery program relies on volunteer drivers to take cancer patients to and from their treatments. Lack of transportation is often a major problem for cancer patients when either they have no transportation or are too ill to drive. Family and friends may help, but are not always available.

We are looking for more volunteer drivers to help cancer patients in your area. Time commitments vary but rides are generally during the weekday and each Road to Recovery volunteer driver decides how much time he or she contributes. Requirements for participation include a valid, current driver’s license, a safe driving record and proof of insurance, as well as completing the application process and a brief training session.

For more information on volunteering as a Road to Recovery driver, contact the American Cancer Society at 1-800-227-2345 or visit cancer.org/drive.

Newer MT member Pablo Gutierrez has accepted a promotional opportunity with Wells Fargo. This new role will take him to Sparks Nevada. Pablo regrets his fast departure and not being able to say goodbye to his MT friends. He was very surprised that he was chosen for this position and he referred to it a “dream job”.

This move will also take I’m closer to family. He mentioned to Wells Fargo that he wants to continue in Rotary and has started exploring the many Rotary clubs in the Sparks/Reno area. His email will stay the same, so if any of us are in the area he encourages us to look him up.

Brian Monroe

Jeff Reed, 6270 District Governor, welcomes Andrea Jorgensen to Mequon Thiensville Sunrise Rotary club. Pictured L to R: Jeff Reed, Cindy Shaffer - Club President, Andrea Jorgensen, Tom Martin - Andrea’s sponsor and Terry Schacht - Assistant District Governor. (Photo by Bob Blazich)

At a recent Rotary meeting, we had the pleasure of being introduced to Julie Zumach from the organization Our Community Listens.  I am very excited about the future of Our Community Listens and the positive impact it will have on the lives of people in Mequon and the surrounding communities. This FREE 3 day communication skills course will be held right here at Newcastle Place September 19-21.

This event is open to anyone 18 and older.  Please note the maximum class size is 18, so don't delay!

Questions? Contact Jennifer Sutherland at jsutherland@newcastleplace.com.

 
 
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Our Mailing Address:
MT Sunrise Rotary
6079 Mequon Road
PMB 123
Mequon, WI 53092

 
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Speakers
Dave Romoser and Ellen Blather
Sep 22, 2017
Serenity Inns
Rachel Monaco-Wilcox, J.D. Lotus Legal
Oct 20, 2017
Human Trafficking
Julie Kerk & Dr. Jonathan Campbell
Nov 03, 2017
Froedtert & the Medical College of Wisconsin Mequon Health Center
Joy Tapper - Executive Director
Nov 10, 2017
Milwaukee Health Care Partnership
 
 
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